NER Class R (LNER D20) Boiler Pressure & Livery

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Majormagna
NER J27 0-6-0
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NER Class R (LNER D20) Boiler Pressure & Livery

Post by Majormagna » Thu Jun 27, 2019 9:57 pm

I'm having a bit of trouble regarding the D20, the first paragraph on the D20's page (Here) states they were built with a maximum working boiler pressure of 200lb/in², the boiler is also listed as having a pressure of 160lb/in², I assume this was when the locomotives were fitted with superheaters (As per NER practice), but my Ian Allan ABCs state the pressure was 175lb/in² by 1944.

My question is, when did this happen? I'm assuming prior to 1923, as the R1s (D21) also had their pressure reduced to 160lb/in² (from 225lb/in²) when superheated, and upped again to 175lb/in² prior to grouping.

Liveries, part the first:The preserved D17, as with the D20s, is dual braked; on the tender the air standpipe is painted white and the vac one is painted red (I know that NER carriages had a red V and/or a white W to show with what brake system they were fitted, vacuum, westinghouse, or both), did dual-braked locos also have this colour coding?

Part the second: In 1900, two B13s had gold lining (gold leaf?) added to them for hauling a Royal Train, the NER Record Vol.3 Page 122 states that afterwards this livery was also applied to other classes of locomotive ("Gold lining was subsequently adopted for all other principal classes of locomotives, and for those tank engines reserved for hauling the NER officers' saloons.").

I assume the D20 was included in this, and that at some point the Gold was replaced with "straw yellow", but was this livery retained until 1923?

Thanks in advancve for any help!
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drmditch
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Re: NER Class R (LNER D20) Boiler Pressure & Livery

Post by drmditch » Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:58 am

Sorry not to have replied earlier, but I have been distracted by diode failures and a broken tie-bar in a very inconvenient position.

RCTS Part 3c lists boiler pressure at Grouping as 160, but states that the diagram was corrected a year later to state 175.
In discussing boiler development before super-heating the pressure is described as 200.


As regards livery, the F. Moore painting of an R1 shown as the frontispiece on Nock's 'Locomotives of the North Eastern Railway' shows all the glory of polished brass and gold lining, but I have never seen any suggestion that this lining was used on a regular basis. It is such a shame that the R1's performance didn't match their looks.

Ken Hoole in his 'Illustrated History of 'NER Locomotives' pages 209 et seq. mentions the special finish given to Class R No.2110 for hauling King Edward VII to open his eponymous bridge in 1906, and that some of the 4-6-0s had red, white, and gold lining added to their black livery.

It would surprise me if W.W, having effected a cost reduction of some £7 per locomotive compared with his brother's more ornate livery would have been allowed to increase costs again on a regular basis. I wonder where the statement on page 122 of NE Record Part 3 that 'gold lining was subsequently adopted for other principal classes of locomotive' comes from? Perhaps it might be possible to find some post 1904 paint specifications.

Majormagna
NER J27 0-6-0
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Re: NER Class R (LNER D20) Boiler Pressure & Livery

Post by Majormagna » Fri Jul 05, 2019 5:11 pm

drmditch wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:58 am
Sorry not to have replied earlier, but I have been distracted by diode failures and a broken tie-bar in a very inconvenient position.
No worries, thanks for the response.
drmditch wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 7:58 am
It would surprise me if W.W, having effected a cost reduction of some £7 per locomotive compared with his brother's more ornate livery would have been allowed to increase costs again on a regular basis.
Perhaps, but the T.W.Worsdell livery was applied on ALL locomotives, wheras my interpretation is that this "extra gold lining" was applied on express passenger locomotives and those designated to officers' and inspection trains (Such as NER No. 66 "Aerolite", as she is preserved).
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