Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

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60526
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Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

Post by 60526 » Sat Mar 09, 2019 11:36 am

In reading Jonathan's West End Workbench and his photos of private owner wagons has triggered me to remembering that I had recently seen details of an Enfield private owner wagon which I had never come across before, I use to live there. I'm a member of Newhaven MRC and we're in a bit of a dire straight with our landlord, you know when you are not wanted. So we are taking the plunge and in the process of negotiating to go into new premises with a far far higher rent but at least we can see some future there and be able to expand our membership for able bodied as well as disabled modellers. Stay with us. We have accumulated a lot of model railway items over the years and our committee has decided to drastically reduce the size of our library, apparently because nobody hardly uses it, well my name must be Hardly. The bottom line is that I am taking away a large number of magazines going back to the 1920's. Some have already been filtered out and will eventually be given to the Bluebell Railway Std 2 fund to sell, others were going to be sold for club funds but the majority are in bound volumes and in producing these it looks like they have used a large paper shear to cut the edges straight and chopped some of content off, but as far as I can see it is all still there. Another explanation for getting rid of these magazines is that most of the information can be found on the internet, I don't think so, I can see much later magazine articles have copied some of earlier content, but the majority I have not seen, mind you with RlyMdlr, BRM, MRail, HbyMag, MRJ and any others, you'd have to be buying the whole lot to cover all articles. Going way back what is interesting is 4mm models being produced in the 1920's, although my wife might call me some else, we are generally railway modellers but back then they were model engineers which makes it more interesting, making a Holden F6 without a Gibson kit, Markits wheels and a modern motor would be a challenge back then. Some of these magazines I have are not in the best condition, I'm thinking that I might split them apart and scan interesting articles. Has anyone else scanned old magazine articles from the past and would like to share these? How far back do you have to go before copyright is contravened. With what Jonathan and the Grantham crew get up to there might be some interesting details to show.
Charlie

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

Post by All thumbs » Sat Mar 09, 2019 3:14 pm

This is a complicated area and I suggest you read the Wikipedia article at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright ... ed_Kingdom.

Essentially, 70 years after publication is the benchmark but you need to be aware that if the article is ascribed to a named author then that is 70 years after the author's death.
Be gentle! Returning to the hobby after more than 20 years away...

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - LNER Concrete Brake Vans

Post by 60526 » Wed Mar 20, 2019 12:24 am

Thanks for the reply, a total minefield by the looks of it, something made by lawyers for lawyers. Looking back at my original text it is a bit cloudy, not everyone can have access to these old magazines. What I had in mind was to highlight anything I come across that relating to LNER/BR(E) that could be of interest. Concrete LNER brake vans is a new one on me, how would I post details of this for instance?

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - LNER Concrete Brake Vans

Post by 65447 » Wed Mar 20, 2019 2:21 pm

60526 wrote:
Wed Mar 20, 2019 12:24 am
Concrete LNER brake vans is a new one on me, how would I post details of this for instance?
You'd use this thread... viewtopic.php?f=5&t=319 :wink:

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - GC Valour Class

Post by 60526 » Fri Jan 24, 2020 12:04 pm

I thought that I would just test the water to see if this is of interest to anyone.
Perhaps the lads who have been making a model of one of these recently might comment on this extract from the Model Railway News December 1927, especially the last paragraph.
Valour.jpg
My Favourite Prototype
No.11 – The Great Central “Valour” Class
I was greatly impressed after reading Mr. Barrie's article in the May, 1927, MODEL RAILWAY NEWS, and I agree with him entirely in his views on the Great Central " Directors." These engines are, in my estimation, the most efficient and best-looking engines of the 4-4-0 class that have ever appeared, just as the six-coupled "Valour" type, in my mind at least, represents the piece de resistance in 4-6-0 loco­motives.
Designed by the celebrated Mr. J. G. Robinson, and built at Gorton Works, Great Central Railway, the pioneer, " Lord Faringdon," being completed in 1918, these engines were set to work the heavy trains over the steepest sections of the Great Central main line, which is the most heavily graded route in this country.
They are really an improvement on the "Sir Sam Fay" class. Leading dimensions are : Four cylinders, measuring 16 in. (diameter) by 26 in. (stroke) ; steam pressure, 180 lb. per sq. in. ; tractive effort at 85 per cent. boiler pressure, 25,145 lb. ; maximum weight in working order (including tender), 127 tons 8 cwt. ; grate area, 26 sq. ft.; diameter of driving wheels, 6 ft. 9 in. ; of bogies, 3 ft. 6 in. There are six engines of this class. The most famous is undoubtedly "Valour," built in 1920. This engine is the travelling War memorial of the Great Central Railway.
After the grouping of 1923,- all six of these engines were removed to the G.N. section, where they did splendid work, hauling generally, the " Edinburgh Pullman" over the G.N. main line from King's Cross to York and back. Several of them, notably" Earl Haig," put up wonderful performances of speed, and there is an instance of one which, delayed by signals about 135 miles north of London for as long as eight minutes, proceeded to traverse the distance to King's Cross in approximately 133 minutes, with a load of 285 tons (about), excluding, of course, engine and tender.
Models of these engines can be purchased, but it is far cheaper and much better fun to buy the parts and put them together, especially as the "Lord Faringdon" type are extremely handsome, and, as Mr. Barrie stated about " Director" models, their boilers, being large, make possible the use of electric or clockwork motors of maximum dimensions.
Last edited by 60526 on Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:49 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - LNER Special Wagon Painting & Classification

Post by 60526 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 11:22 am

Extract from the September 1928 edition of Model Railway News
Notes on' L.N.E.R. Special Wagons.
Introductory, Painting, and Classification.
By Capt Sir Eric Hutchison, Bart.
According to the official classifications, there are 187 types of special wagons in use on the L.N.E.R., representing 26 different classes. By far the greater number of these are vehicles taken over from the pre-grouping companies, only a very few special wagons having been built after the amalgamation. It is obviously impossible to describe all these various types, and I will, therefore, give an account of a typical wagon of each class, except where types vary considerably, in which case two or more examples may be taken.
20Ttubewagon.jpg
Side elevation of a LNER 20ton tube wagon, illustrating the standard method of lettering used on the wagons of this line.

I propose to give drawings of these wagons in pre-grouping painting wherever this is possible, and in order that readers may adapt these drawings to post-grouping colours perhaps it will not be out of place to give a resume of the standard L.N.E.R. lettering.
The body colour, in the case of ordinary " non-fitted" wagons, is dark grey, and in the case of vehicles fitted with automatic brakes or pipes, is brown oxide. Insulated vans fitted with meat hooks and fitted with automatic brakes or pipes are white. If meat hooks are not provided the vans are painted the colour of standard stock, i.e., grey or brown oxide.
Engineers' department wagons are light blue, and wagons not adapted for use on running lines are green. All ironwork on or above the solebar, including buffer bodies, is the colour of the wagon. Buffer beads and shanks, coupling hooks and all ironwork below the solebar are black. Wheel tyres are white. The upright pipes of automatic brakes are black if brakes are fitted, or vermilion if the wagon is piped only. With regard to the lettering, the initial letters N.E. are, wherever possible 18 in. by 12 in., although in the case of special wagons it is not often that there is enough space to permit of this size being adopted. The carrying capacity of the vehicle appears in 4 in. letters in the bottom left-hand corner. Covered vans with sliding doors have the number of the van in 5 in. figures in the centre of the door. In all other wagons it appears in the lower right-hand corner. The code name, if any, appears in the centre in 4 in. letters between the initials N. and E. The tare weight is in 3½ in. figures on the solebar, generally over the right-hand wheel, and above it, in 1¼ in. letters, the date of lifting and painting. Close to it is a black patch (grey in the case of brown-oxide stock) about 10 in. square on which is chalked the station and date of the last axlebox oiling. Wagons with grease boxes do not have this patch.
Table.jpeg
The table above gives the particulars of the special wagon classification, code names, and number of types in each class. I propose to adhere to the order in which these wagons appear in the table when describing them, and will illustrate at least, one of each code name, and give a few notes on the construction of each wagon, with remarks on the type of load carried and the method of securing it in transit.
It may be remarked that for purposes of requisitioning, etc., all types of which there are more than one example are given a letter in addition to their code name (e.g., Imp A,, Mac N), but these letters do not appear on the wagon. Only such letters as are painted on the wagon are shown in the above table (e.g., Arm D, Flatrol Q, etc.).

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

Post by Hatfield Shed » Mon Jan 27, 2020 12:11 pm

I could read this type of material all day, but unfortunately the extensive work in making it available would be burdensome. Picking out the 'information that might otherwise be lost' as a means of selection?

Sir Eric Hutchison was a very well known modeller, I recall the obit. notice - probably in Railway Modeller - that described the scope of his activity. As an officer of the RA he may well have produced something on rail movement of artillery and munitions; that would be worth looking out for.

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

Post by 60526 » Mon Jan 27, 2020 1:39 pm

I suppose this started in finding details of Enfield labelled coal wagons in an old magazine that my club was disposing of, I then found details of a SR track cleaning wagon, none of my model railway friends knew anything of this so I decided to look further at the magazines to see if there was anything further of interest. There are another 9 articles from the 1920's that will be scanned and put on the forum all of LNER interest. The company I work for has given me a lovely letter telling me that my job is being terminated, so while they go through their redundancy procedures I'm using my time scanning articles for my own use and if I come across anything else of interest I will add them.

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - Macs, Twin Imps & Rectanks

Post by 60526 » Tue Jan 28, 2020 12:27 pm

Extract from the December1928 edition of Model Railway News
Notes on L.N.E.R. Special Wagons.
"Macs," "Twin Imps," and "Rectanks."
By Capt Sir Eric Hutchison, Bart.
The " Macs " comprise a class of wagon similar in many respects to the "Imps," but they are designed to carry higher loads, and they have, therefore, a lower floor level. There are 14 different types of "Macs" in service, all of which were taken over from the pre-grouped companies as follows:- G.C.R., 4, -G.N.R., 3; -G.E.R., 3 ; -N.E.R., 2; - N.B.R., 1; and -G.N.S.R., 1. The carrying capacity varies between 10 and 25 tons. On the whole, they are remarkably free from running restrictions. The only ones which I know of are that G.N.R. I5-ton " Macs M" are not allowed to proceed to Folkestone and Chatham Dockyard without permission, and.N.E.R. 25-ton " Mac J " No. 9289, a bogie vehicle, and G.E.R. 10-ton "Mac O" No. 21953 are both restricted from the late L.S.W.R. without permission. This G.E. "Mac" is interesting as being the only piped "Mac" in existence on the L.N.E.R. It has both vacuum and Westinghouse pipes, and it is further noteworthy in having removable beams, which are supplied on demand, similar to some of the trolleys, about which we shall hear more in due course.
All " Macs " are very similar in design, the chief point of difference being in the length. They are provided with securing rings either on the floor or on the outside of the side frames, to which the load is lashed with rope. It is very rarely indeed that chains are used with this class of wagon. Loads are generally bulky, such as agricultural tractors, threshing machines and such like, but I have not infrequently seen crated motor-car chassis loaded on them. In these hard times, railways will use the first wagon which comes handy rather than delay traffic, though this sometimes means carrying a five or six ton load on a 20 or 30 ton wagon. Loads are generally secured by chocks or scotches nailed to the wooden floor of the vehicle, and by ropes to the lashing rings. The load is then sheeted, if required, and a steadying rope is passed over all so as to resist any tendency of the traffic to fall over sideways. This steadying rope is made fast to the highest convenient point of the load, and in cases where the weight is considerable, two or more ropes are employed.
The accompanying photograph, re­produced from an official photograph by kind permission of the L.N.E.R. Co., shows the design of a typical " Mac " very clearly. The vehicle in question is a G.N. section wagon, and has had the initials G.N. replaced by N.E. Otherwise the painting is typical of pre-group G.N. practice.
mac.jpeg
If required in post-grouping colours, the letters N.E. remain as on the photograph. The carrying capacity on the left-hand end is shortened to read " 15 tons " instead of " Load 15 tons " and the number 404268 appears in a corresponding position on the right. This means that "Return to Lincoln" must go elsewhere; it is painted in the centre of the side frames, with the code name " Mac " above it in the centre of the floor edging. The tare weight remains unchanged.
macGN+GE.jpg
Modelling a " Mac "
From the model point of view, however, this wagon is not very suitable to make, because of difficulties in the way of fitting the inner frames, which carry the springs and axleboxes. I have accordingly drawn out a G.E. section wagon, which is here illustrated in G.E.R. colours, and which is of much more straight forward design. The only things at all likely to present difficulty to the beginner are the little triangular stay brackets between the floor and the side frames. However, these are really very easy to make, and lend a touch of distinction to the wagon. I am sorry I have not been able to get a photograph of this " Mac," so I have prepared the perspective drawing reproduced herewith. This, I think, brings out the main features of the wagon.
In modelling it, the first thing to do is to cut the two side frames out. They should be cut out and finished to size whilst clamped together, so that both are exactly similar. Before unclamping them, the holes for the axle journals should be drilled. The standard" 0" gauge tender axleboxes and springs will do well enough, although they are on the heavy side. The holes for the journals should be drilled 3/16 in, and two 3/32 in holes will also be required 1/2 in above the hole for the journal and 29/32 in apart. These are for the small projections at the back of the spring pins.
Twelve triangular stay brackets are next required to act as supports between the side members of the frame and the floor. The size of these is measured off the end elevation drawing, and they must be very carefully finished dead to size, since a great deal of the appearance of the finished wagon depends upon the accuracy with which they are made and fitted. The headstocks are next prepared and fitted with the shaped plates which cover the buffers. The next operation is the attachment to the main frames of the axleboxes and the triangular stay brackets. Six transverse cross-members of flat stuff about 3/16 in by 1/16 in section are required, partly as stiffeners and partly to provide a means for attaching the floor. To this end they are used on the flat and are drilled for 1/8 in 00 or 000 wood screws, two holes in each crosspiece. These holes should be countersunk from the underneath side. These crosspieces are fitted, one behind each solebar, one near the lower end of each end ramp, and one near each end of the flat centre part of the floor. Since they support the floor, it follows that their top surfaces should be flush with the top edge of the side frames, and that their exact positions are immaterial. The assembly of the headstocks to side members and the fitting of these crosspieces is next proceeded with. Do not forget to put the wheels and axles in position before soldering the whole together. The addition of brakes, or at least of brake handles and racks, buffers, and three­link couplings completes the wagon except for the floor.
This is cut from 1/8 in. wood, as are the two end ramps. They are scribed transversely into boards 5 mm. wide. Three lashing rings are required on each side of the centre flat floor, one in the centre and the other two at the two corners. All are close to the outer edge of the floor. These rings are simply plain rings of wire about 5 mm. in diameter, fixed to the floor by staples. The wagon is completed by the addition of the edging to the floor and ramps. This should be attached by means of small pins or screws, the heads of which are well countersunk, and then covered with solder, the surplus solder being carefully removed so as to leave an absolutely flat surface to the edging.
The wagon is painted in standard colours, which are well enough known to need no comment. The drawing shows pre-grouping painting, and the remarks regarding post - grouping painting of the G.N.R. " Macs " apply equally to this vehicle with the exception of the legend " Return to Lincoln." The G.E.R. numbers of this class of " Mac " were 21651 to 21730, 21903 to 21922, 21933 to 21952, 21954 to 21963, and 21991 to 22000.
The post-grouping numbers are the same except that they are preceded by a 6.
Soldering and Rust
To those who are not seasoned model makers may I give two little bits of advice. Firstly, use brass in preference to tinplate wherever possible, it does not rust. Secondly, no matter whether you are soldering in brass or tin, but especially if you are using tin, do not be afraid to scrub the work well in hot water and soda when the soldering is finished. Indeed, I would go further, and would say this - scrub the job, if it is tinplate, after each part is soldered on, drying it well before the next piece is soldered. This may seem a lot of trouble, but it must be remembered that rust carries on its work of destruction underneath paint just as readily as it does when no paint is present. I have seen more than one good piece of work ruined by rust which was started by using an acid flux which was not thoroughly cleaned off afterwards.
twinimp.jpg
Twin " Imps "
These wagons may be dismissed with the briefest of remarks. They are of three classes: 10 tons, 15 tons and 20 tons each, and are all ex-G.C.R. They are standard " Imps " with the ramps, buffers and couplings at one end removed, and these two ends permanently coupled together in a similar manner to twin timber wagons.
The 10-ton "Twin Imps" are merely two of the wagons illustrated in the October Model Railway News coupled together. Their numbers - there is only one pair in existence - were 8470 and 8471, and their tare 5.2.3 each. Since grouping their numbers are, of course, 508470 and 508471. They have four wheels each.
The 15 and 20 ton "Twin Imps" are six wheeled vehicles. The latter are illustrated here in post-grouping colours. For end elevation see drawing of 10-ton " Imp " in October, 1928, issue. Their numbers run in sequence from 31803 to 31822, that is to say, their pre-grouping numbers. If required separately by readers who wish to build up a single " Imp," one of the vehicles of the twin pair should be taken and a new headstock and ramps fitted at the inner end. The numbers of these single " Imps “ run from 31823 to 31852 inclusive, the standard tare being 8.17.2. They are designed for a minimum curve of 99-ft. radius, and are, when coupled as twins, provided with removable radial bolsters for carrying boilers.
rectank.jpg
" Rectanks "
These are, in effect , bogie flat wagons and are made with timber .floors. They are 40 in number. Some have bolsters fitted immediately over the inner wheel of each bogie, and vehicles so fitted are known as "Bolrecs."
"Rectanks" were, I believe, originally designed during the late War to carry tanks. To support the ends whilst their load was moving on or off they had jacks, which could be screwed down to bear upon the head of the rail. Most " Rcctanks " have the jack fittings removed, though some nine have the jack screws stowed in the chain box fitted between the stays under the wagon, while the stirrups and scotches remain in position. Others, again, have the complete jacks left in place. The numbers of a few in which the jack screws have been removed are 17209, 20600, 33200, and 42203. "Rectanks" which still have the jack are Nos. 1051, 9950, 9991, 12643, etc.
The accompanying drawing shows a "Rectank" in post-grouping colours, and requires no explanation. It should be noted that these wagons are not suitable for carrying traction engines, since they have not proper scotching arrangements. This remark is prompted by a request which I recently got from a model maker who wanted a drawing of a "Rectank" which was to carry a traction engine. I am afraid that he was rather disappointed when I pointed out that he could only prevent end movement by securing the load with such heavy chains and by screwing them up so tightly that some part would be strained or damaged. Eventually, I am glad to say, that I prevailed upon him to use a proper traction engine wagon, drawings and photographs of which will appear in the next part of this series.

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

Post by Dave » Tue Jan 28, 2020 1:35 pm

Thank you for posting, all very interesting especially the Rectank info.
You can't have enough wagon porn you know.

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

Post by Hatfield Shed » Tue Jan 28, 2020 3:36 pm

Also interesting that both the designs with drawings in this article; the GER design Mac and the Rectank/Bolrecs, would eventually be available as 4mm kits. The Mac as an Airfix kit, now I believe available from Dapol, and the Rectank/Bolrecs from ABS in whitemetal with the parts to construct whichever version was desired. I expect a great many LNER/ER layouts will have examples of these kits operating on them.

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - Tractions, Flats & Boilers

Post by 60526 » Wed Jan 29, 2020 9:08 am

Extract from February 1929 edition of Model Railway News
Notes on L.N.E.R. Special Wagons.
"Tractions," "Flats,'' and "Boilers." Pt1
By Capt. Sir Eric Hutchison, Bart.
The traction engine wagons all belong to the N.E.R. section, and are of four classes, two of 25 tons and two of 35 tons carrying capacity. Tractions A and B, the 25 ton wagons, have timber floors and are very antiquated vehicles. Owing chiefly to the heavy timber framing the bogies have not a large lock, so little, in fact, that Traction A requires a curve of no less than 120 ft. radius, while Traction B is not much better with 85 ft. The C and D types are modern wagons with steel floors and underframes, and a more reasonable minimum curve of 50 ft. radius. All four types are virtually bogie flat wagons with an adjustable and removable scotching device to hold the load steady during transit. This chocking arrangement is not, presumably, regarded as part of the wagon, as it has to be requisitioned along with the wagon when required.
tractionD.jpg
Constructing a Model " Traction "
My drawing this month shows Traction D, and is, I think, sufficiently clear to require little or no explanation. For model purposes, the floor should be made of good flat brass or stout tinplate. The greatest care should be taken to get really flat stuff free from cross wind. A slight bend, such as is got from rolling, is not a serious defect, since it can be straightened out when the sole channels are soldered on, but a cross wind will be found almost impossible to eliminate. This is because in the model the floor is so much stronger than the underframe that the tendency is for the latter to be pulled out of the flat and for the whole wagon to take on a permanent warp. To guard against the danger of distorting the floor this should be sawn out to shape, and not on any account cut with shears. The rest of the wagon is easily constructed out of strip, channel and angle. It is a matter of individual taste whether the chocks should be adjustable and removable, or whether they should be merely for show, and readers who build any of these wagons must decide this point according to their personal opinions.
It is unfortunate that channel brass of the correct section for most special wagons is so difficult to obtain. I would most strongly recommend that channel of the proper size should be built up rather than that too heavy a size should be used, even though the heavy section may be obtained commercially. It does not take long to solder up brass strips into channels, and it is well worth while; a model built of too-heavy channels has an out-of-scale, clumsy appearance, and to avoid this it pays to make channel up specially when required.
There are four Traction D wagons in present use, numbered 3217, 5243, 6334 and 22086. The standard tare weight is 14.11.0, including the chocks, which weigh 7 cwt. each.
I've had to split this posting up because of a restriction on the number of attachments that I can submit in one go, so Flats and Boiler will follow.

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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - Tractions, Flats & Boiler

Post by 60526 » Wed Jan 29, 2020 9:13 am

Extract from February 1929 edition of Model Railway News
Notes on L.N.E.R. Special Wagons.
"Tractions," "Flats,'' and "Boilers." Pt2
By Capt. Sir Eric Hutchison, Bart.
Flats
Flat wagons are absolutely indispensable, and are useful for a variety of types of loads. They vary in carrying capacity from the small 9 ton G.N.R. Flats A to the 60 ton N.E.R. Flats Q, which run on two six wheeled bogies and are used in pairs of threes with special girders and cradles as gun sets. Mr. Keen's well known gun set of three Flats Q is an excellent example of how loads of this description are dealt with. Flats A to D, F, G, and H are four wheeled wagons belonging to various component companies of the L.N.E.R. E, J to M, and P are six-wheeled vehicles (P is made out of old tender frames and floors) and O and Q are12-wheeled wagons. The two latter are specially arranged for gun carrying, and Flats Q are shortly to be used for transporting large electric transformers. Flat N is the only eight wheeled bogie flat in use, and is a N.B. section vehicle.
I have taken the N.B. section Flat G as a typical wagon of this class chiefly because of its very distinctive appearance, a distinction shared with the N.B. timber wagons and timber built plate wagons. In these flats, the headstocks project beyond the solebars for some 3 in., and both headstocks and soles are rebated to take the floor boards.
flatG.jpg
A Model " Flat "
In modelling these wagons the effect is obtained by either fitting the floor between the headstocks and soles, these being of equal depth or else the floor can be fitted on the top of shallow soles and the headstocks made as deep as the soles plus the floor. Both methods seem equally good.
The lashing rings are made of short lengths of 18 gauge soft copper or brass wire which have been flattened in two planes at right angles to each other, as shown in the sketch. If the wire is really soft, it can be flattened easily by hammering. The lengths are drilled for the rings and also with a No. 70 drill for the securing pins. They are glued and pinned to the soles with the well-known Leeds brass pins.
The design of horse hook is noteworthy and is a type found on all the Scottish railways.
Details of ring iron and horse hook for N.B.R. 20-ton Flat wagons.
It is easily made in the same manner as the lashing ring irons, i.e., by hammering a short piece of wire flat in the centre, drilling this for the securing pins, and carefully turning up the jaws of the hook. The latter operation is not easy, and unless carried out with the greatest care the hook is apt to break at the fixing holes.
Pre-grouping painting, as shown, may be modified thus to suit post grouping practice: Replace N.B. by N.E., paint 20 tons in the left-hand lower and the number in the right-hand lower corner of the solebar. The tare weight appears over the right-hand wheel and the code name, FLAT, in the centre. The quatrefoil and crescent, so typical of the N.B.R., do not, of course, appear. I have noticed that individual wagons vary somewhat as regards the position of the number plate and the exact position of the code name and tare weight, but the regulation position for the two latter is as mentioned above, and the L.N.E.R. number plate should be attached in the same position as the N.B. one. These wagons have grease axle boxes and do not, therefore, have a black patch on the solebar.
The numbers run from 27312 to 27333, the tares varying between 5.7.2 and 6.0.1. The following are the corresponding numbers and tares of some of the wagons :-
27312, 5.7.2; 27313, 5.12.3; 27314, 5.15.0 ; 27315, 5.10.3 ; 27316, 5.11.1 ; 27317, 5.13.0; 37318, 5.11.2; 27319, 5.12.1 ; 27320, 5.16.1.
A very typical load for these flats is a large hexagonal ingot, measuring about 3 ft. across the flat and being some 8 ft. long. Such a load is mounted on two battens laid crosswise on the wagon to allow of the lifting chains being passed underneath it, and it is secured by chains passed over it from side to side of the wagon and tightened down with screw shackles. Its weight is generally reckoned as being sufficient to prevent end move­ment. Ingots of this description are frequently landed at the ports on the Firth of Forth, and are frequently seen on flats of this type. Sections of ships' propeller shafts are also some­times, though rarely, loaded on flats. Quads and Quints, which will be described in a later issue, are more suitable and are more generally used.
Boilers
Boilers, like Imps, may either be single or twin, and I propose to describe these as two distinct types of wagon. The type of single boiler wagon chosen is a G.N. section vehicle, Boiler C, of which there are two in use, Nos. 5738 and 5756, both with a tare of 13.14. By the courtesy of the L.N.E.R. I am able to illustrate this class of wagon by the official photograph. In this photograph the initials G.N. have been touched out and N.E. substituted. The painting is not, therefore, standard L.N.E. practice. The line drawing shows post grouping painting, while if N.E. is replaced in the photograph by G.N., the pre­grouping style of lettering is obtained.
These boiler wagons have bolsters which can be moved to a variety of different positions, or they can be removed altogether. Nothing need be said as regards the construction of the wagons, for this follows closely that adopted in the case of the tractions. The only point of difference is that the tractions have steel floors, whereas the boilers have wooden ones. The wooden floor places a restriction on the load, which if not occupying the full length of the wagon, must not be concentrated more than 20 tons for 10 ft.
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60526
GNSR D40 4-4-0
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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles - LNER Steam Rail Coaches

Post by 60526 » Wed Jan 29, 2020 9:23 am

Extract from February 1929 edition of Model Railway News
LNER Steam Rail Coaches
SteamRailCoach.jpg
The L.N.E.R. have started a service in outlying Notts districts with the new Sentinel-Cammell steam rail coach. These "baby" trains accom­modate about 60 passengers and are for service where passenger traffic does not warrant the running of an ordinary train. They doubtless will play an increasingly important part in the railway companies' endeavour to retrieve some of the passenger traffic that has been won by road vehicles.

It is a pity that there was not more narrative with this, but the term "baby" trains is interesting.

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manna
LNER A4 4-6-2 'Streak'
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Re: Old Model Railway Magazine Articles

Post by manna » Wed Jan 29, 2020 9:48 pm

G'Day Gents

Very interesting thread. Thanks for putting it up.

manna
EDGWARE GN, Steam in the Suburbs.

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