Edward Thompson. Good or Bad

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john coffin
LNER P2 2-8-2
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Re: Edward Thompson. Good or Bad

Post by john coffin »

It is plain that you are not prepared to listen to any help, be it potential helpful, or neutral, however.

I have only said that it is likely that trying to sell two books on the same obscure person in the same year
is likely to be difficult for the second book, since it was late to the market. It might well sell, but considerably
less than had it been the only book on the market at the time.

From all you have written here, I am not convinced that you have any more data about Thompson the man
that would make a second biography too valuable to those who might be interested. You almost certainly have
more information about Thompson than I have access to because I have not been that bothered about him as a
person who figures within my interest range. However I did pick a couple of errors about which I do know some thing,
but then I have not yet found a factual book that some one does not later complain about errors within.

Since I know about publishing a little, I do know for certain that many so called errors in books are nothing to do with the
author rather the sub editing. ALL books require to fit to a certain number of pages, to meet certain price criteria, and
still have a decent readable flow, but few sub editors are experts in all the fields they have to edit, so may not understand
that cutting certain items or changing the flow makes a considerable difference to facts or the story. Once it is with the
subbie, it is very rare for the author to get things changed.

The market for autobiographies is some what small, whilst that for articles about locomotives and their development
has much wider appeal. Is there space for another book on Gresley? Almost certainly because he has a special place
in the heart of most railway enthusiasts, but rather like the William Brown Volume on Hush Hush, or Peter Tuffrey on the 2-8-2's
books that are not directly biographies are most likely to sell widely because they combine things, and
any personal data is merely part of the story.

Just remember that from the outside, you are a man who is prepared to accept model carriages that have no
bearing on the railway they claim to be from, ie the Hattons and Hornby generic carriages as GNR carriages to which
they have no bearing. That makes one question your insistence that others published works are full of errors.

That you are prepared to write and attempt to publish a book on a figure of minor notoriety does you credit,
but don't expect everybody to buy into your views and or your books.

Paul
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richard
LNER A4 4-6-2 'Streak'
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Re: Edward Thompson. Good or Bad

Post by richard »

I appreciate you're both trying to be polite!
Just remember that from the outside, you are a man who is prepared to accept model carriages that have no
bearing on the railway they claim to be from, ie the Hattons and Hornby generic carriages as GNR carriages to which
they have no bearing. That makes one question your insistence that others published works are full of errors.
However, I think I'm going to have to disagree with the above, and I don't think there's any connection.
Intended modelling accuracy varies a lot depending on a range of things - patience, time, skills, what can you actually see, etc. There are always compromises. Some glaring - even for the finescale guys/gals! (all those statue people!)
I don't think this necessarily correlates with historical accuracy.

As for two books at the same time: Happens a lot. Also with movies. I think we have to trust the publisher to make the right decision either way.
Richard Marsden
LNER Encyclopedia
S.A.C. Martin
LNER A4 4-6-2 'Streak'
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Re: Edward Thompson. Good or Bad

Post by S.A.C. Martin »

Thank you Richard for your response.

The coaches thing is an odd thing to pick out - I work up to 60 hours a week, I concentrate a lot of effort on other things, I don't build as much as I used to: why does that somehow define the entire nine years worth of research work I have put into writing my book on Thompson?

Regarding the information and research I have collated - I am confident in my work. Happily I have several new sources and have the stats and graphical analysis to back it up.
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NZRedBaron
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Re: Edward Thompson. Good or Bad

Post by NZRedBaron »

So, I've just watched the Railway Mania podcast about Edward Thompson; and I have to admit, the thing did give me a lot of food for thought.

I'd always viewed Thompson as being a difficult man personally, but a talented and experimental engineer working in an equally difficult time and place; but having listened to the podcast, it cast new light on the situation, and gave me a greater measure of respect for him.
S.A.C. Martin
LNER A4 4-6-2 'Streak'
Posts: 2058
Joined: Thu Jul 23, 2009 6:11 pm

Re: Edward Thompson. Good or Bad

Post by S.A.C. Martin »

Morning all,

Just to keep you in the loop, as per on Nat Pres. I am awaiting the final copy for editing and approval from my publisher ahead of printing very shortly. Exciting times!

Best wishes

Simon
NZRedBaron wrote: Mon May 24, 2021 6:06 am So, I've just watched the Railway Mania podcast about Edward Thompson; and I have to admit, the thing did give me a lot of food for thought.

I'd always viewed Thompson as being a difficult man personally, but a talented and experimental engineer working in an equally difficult time and place; but having listened to the podcast, it cast new light on the situation, and gave me a greater measure of respect for him.
That podcast remains one of the finest bits of work I am associated with, and the opportunity Corbs gave me to bring the evidence to a wider audience I remain very grateful for.
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